Harvest some inspiration from these school gardens

While Grow to Learn NYC hopes to inspire and facilitate a garden in every school across the city, our inspiration comes from some of the wonderful gardens that already exist in a handful of New York City schools. Scroll down for previews.

P.S. 43 Wanaqua Garden

In the spring of 2010, GrowNYC began working with community volunteers and staff from P.S. 43 to develop the garden as both a learning laboratory and a viable, thriving community space.
Click here for more of Wanaqua Garden's story and photos >

P.S. 217

In a diverse school in Brooklyn, where 20% of incoming students don’t speak English, a garden is the perfect place for learning new languages and bringing together a community.“The garden is a nice, comfortable place for them to come,” said Mary Kay, parent coordinator at P.S. 217.
Click here for more about P.S. 217's school garden.

Three Sisters Garden

This garden began as a collaboration between GrowNYC's Open Space Greening Program, JPMorgan Chase, and the Goodhue Center on Staten Island. Replanted each year, it is and used as a true "teaching garden" by both the after school and summer camp programs. Click here for more of this garden's story and photos >

High School for Public Service

The students East-West School of International Studies receive mentorship from the Holly Civic Association, the Korean Senior Citizen Society of New York, and schoolteachers at East-West.  The Environmental Club takes an active role in caring for the garden.  Click here for more of this garden's story and photos >

Manhattan Middle School for Scientific Inquiry (MS328)

The students East-West School of International Studies receive mentorship from the Holly Civic Association, the Korean Senior Citizen Society of New York, and schoolteachers at East-West.  The Environmental Club takes an active role in caring for the garden.  Click here for more of this garden's story and photos >

Bronx Academy of Letters

The students East-West School of International Studies receive mentorship from the Holly Civic Association, the Korean Senior Citizen Society of New York, and schoolteachers at East-West.  The Environmental Club takes an active role in caring for the garden.  Click here for more of this garden's story and photos >

P.S. 226 Bronx

The students East-West School of International Studies receive mentorship from the Holly Civic Association, the Korean Senior Citizen Society of New York, and schoolteachers at East-West.  The Environmental Club takes an active role in caring for the garden.  Click here for more of this garden's story and photos >

East-West Corner Garden

The students East-West School of International Studies receive mentorship from the Holly Civic Association, the Korean Senior Citizen Society of New York, and schoolteachers at East-West.  The Environmental Club takes an active role in caring for the garden.  Click here for more of this garden's story and photos >

P.S. 32 Brooklyn

P.S. 29 is a fantastic example of the success that comes from full community support and cooperation. In fact, as a participant in the Garden to School Cafe program, students at  PS 29  grow vegetables year-round for use in school lunches and their daily salad bar.  Click here for more of P.S. 29's garden story and photos >

P.S. 29 Brooklyn

P.S. 29 is a fantastic example of the success that comes from full community support and cooperation. In fact, as a participant in the Garden to School Cafe program, students at  PS 29  grow vegetables year-round for use in school lunches and their daily salad bar.  Click here for more of P.S. 29's garden story and photos >

P.S. 295- The Studio School of Arts and Culture

P.S. 29 is a fantastic example of the success that comes from full community support and cooperation. In fact, as a participant in the Garden to School Cafe program, students at  PS 29  grow vegetables year-round for use in school lunches and their daily salad bar.  Click here for more of P.S. 29's garden story and photos >

Randall’s Island Garden

In April 2010, GrowNYC helped to plant a 3,000 square foot “Learning Garden” on Randall’s Island where children can grow and harvest vegetables and take cooking classes. A great field trip destination, where students whose schools that may not yet have a garden can get their hands dirty while learning and taking part in the natural world. Click here for more of Randall Island's gardens story and photos >

Discovery High Garden

The Discovery Garden consists of portable container planters in the school courtyard and vertical walls & indoor growing systems in Steve Ritz's Living Environment Science Classroom. Here theory and practice come together: (plant) development & reproduction are de-mystified, vocabularies are expanded, taste buds are discovered and cooking skills are developed. Click here for more of this garden's story and photos >